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Legal issues in cryptography

  • Edward J. Radlo
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1318)

Keywords

Data Encryption Standard Export Control Commerce Department National Security Agency Digital Signature Algorithm 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Edward J. Radlo
    • 1
  1. 1.Partner, Fenwick & West LLPPalo Alto

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