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Coordination in evolving systems

  • Matthias Radestock
  • Susan Eisenbach
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1161)

Abstract

To facilitate the writing of large maintainable distributed systems we need to separate out various concerns. We view these concerns as being communication, computation, configuration and coordination. We look at the coordination requirements of long running systems, paying particular attention to enabling the dynamic addition and removal of services. We show that the key to a smooth integration of configuration and coordination into systems is a new style of communication. We show how these ideas can be incorporated into the actor model.

Keywords

Actor Model Interactive Layer Computation Part Primitive Actor Dynamic Layer 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Matthias Radestock
    • 1
  • Susan Eisenbach
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of ComputingImperial College of Science, Technology and MedicineLondon

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