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Calculi for qualitative spatial reasoning

  • A. G. Cohn
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1138)

Abstract

Although Qualitative Reasoning has been a lively subfield of AI for many years now, it is only comparatively recently that substantial work has been done on qualitative spatial reasoning; this paper lays out a guide to the issues involved and surveys what has been achieved. The papers is generally informal and discursive, providing pointers to the literature where full technical details may be found.

Keywords

Geographical Information System Spatial Reasoning Visual Language Temporal Reasoning Qualitative Reasoning 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. G. Cohn
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Artificial Intelligence, School of Computer StudiesUniversity of LeedsLeedsUK

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