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Activity theory: Basic concepts and applications

A summary of a tutorial given at the east west HCI95 conference
  • Victor Kaptelinin
  • Kari Kuutti
  • Liam Bannon
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1015)

Abstract

The objective of the tutorial is to introduce attendees to Activity Theory, a general theoretical framework for the analysis of human and communal action in the world. After an overview of the theory, focus shifts to how this framework can be utilized in practice. Some examples are shown of how this framework can provide a fresh perspective on certain extant problems in the fields of HCI and CSCW. Hopefully, participants become more aware of the nature and complexity of current controversies concerning the role of theory in the design of computer artifacts. By the end of the tutorial, participants should be able to understand the basic principles of the approach, and to describe their work activities in ways illuminated by this framework

Keywords

Activity Theory Human Computer Interaction Clinical Decision Support System Cognitive Artifact General Theoretical Framework 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Selected Bibliography

Activity Theory and the Design of Computer Systems

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Other Related Papers

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Victor Kaptelinin
    • 1
  • Kari Kuutti
    • 2
  • Liam Bannon
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of InformaticsUmeå UniversityUmeåSweden
  2. 2.Department of Information Proc. ScienceUniversity of OuluOuluFinland
  3. 3.De7partment of Computer Science & Information SystemsUniversity of LimerickIreland

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