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Industrial design and activity theory: A new direction for designing computer-based artifacts

  • Brad Blumenthal
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1015)

Abstract

This paper attempts to both describe and resolve some of the fundamental differences between the fields of industrial design, activity theory, and human-computer interaction. In particular, the role that social relationships play in using and learning to use artifacts to mediate activities is examined in detail. This examination leads to a unification of theory and practice in the three areas, providing a new perspective for the development of computer-based artifacts (particularly embedded computing systems). Two examples are presented to illustrate how this new perspective can be used both to understand and to guide the process of developing an artifact.

Keywords

Activity Theory Industrial Design Social Message Paging System Soviet Psychology 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Brad Blumenthal
    • 1
  1. 1.Museum of Science and IndustryChicagoUSA

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