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An efficient algorithm for developing topologically valid matchings

  • Liz Hanks
  • Ron K. Cytron
  • Will Gillett
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 937)

Abstract

We examine a problem that arises in physical DNA mapping, namely determining what common DNA is represented in two maps. We first present an example illustrating the properties of DNA mapping, and present some biological background supporting our approach. We present a new graph structure, called the \(\mathcal{Z}\)-graph, that takes advantage of structure that develops during the mapping process, thus catalyzing the discovery of all maximum, topologically valid matchings. We describe an algorithm based on this structure and present experimental data supporting its improved performance as compared with a naive approach.

Keywords

Maximum Matchings Clonal Fragment Maximum Edge Maximal Graph Successor Edge 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Liz Hanks
    • 1
  • Ron K. Cytron
    • 1
  • Will Gillett
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Computer ScienceWashington UniversitySt. LouisUSA

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