Advertisement

Bauhaus Linda

  • Nicholas Carriero
  • David Gelernter
  • Lenore Zuck
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 924)

Abstract

We discuss “Bauhaus Linda” (or Bauhaus for short), a Lindaderived coordination language that is in many ways simultaneously more powerful and simpler than Linda. Bauhaus unifies tuples and tuple spaces, leading to an especially clean treatment of multiple tuple spaces, and treats processes as atomic and explicitly represent able. We present an informal semantics of Bauhaus and discuss an extended example that demonstrates its expressivity and simplicity.

Keywords

Target Node Coordination Structure Atomic Element Tuple Space Live Object 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    N. Carriero, E. Freeman, and D. Gelernter. The lifestreams software architecture. Technical Report TR1054, Yale University, Department of Computer Science, 1994. In preparation.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    N. Carriero and D. Gelernter. Coordination languages and their significance. Commun. ACM, 35(2):97–107, Feb. 1992.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    N. Carriero, D. Gelernter, and L. Zuck. Bauhaus Linda: An Overview. In G. Hommel, editor, Proceedings of the International Workshop on the Quality of Communication-based Systems, Dordrecht, The Netherlands, 1994. Kluwer Academic Publishers.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    N. Carriero, D. Gelernter, and L. Zuck. Capabilities in Bauhaus. Research report, Yale University Department of Computer Science, 1994. In preparation.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    K. M. Chandy and L. Lamport. Distributed snapshots: Determining global states of distributed systems. ACM Trans. Comput. Syst., 3(1):63–75, 1985.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    D. H. Gelernter. Mirror Worlds. Oxford, New York, 1991.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    W. Hasselbring. On integrating generative communication into the prototyping language PROSET. Informatik-Bericht 05-91, UniversitÄt Essen, Dec. 1991.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    S. Jagannathan. TS/Scheme: Distributed Data Structures in Lisp. In 2nd Workshop on Parallel Lisp: Languages, Applications and Systems, Oct. 1992. Also published as: NEC Research Institute Tech Report: 93-042-3-0050-1.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    F. Mattern. Virtual time and global states of distributed systems. In M. Cosnard, editor, Proceedings of the International Workshop on Parallel and Distributed Algorithms, pages 215–226. North-Holland, 1989.Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    C. Morgan. Global and logical time in distributed algorithms. Information Processing Letters, 20:189–194, 1985.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Scientific Computing Associates, New Haven, CT. Paradise: User's Guide and Reference Manual, 1994.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nicholas Carriero
    • 1
  • David Gelernter
    • 1
  • Lenore Zuck
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Computer ScienceYale UniversityNew Haven

Personalised recommendations