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Oblivious signatures

  • Lidong Chen
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 875)

Abstract

Two special digital signature schemes, oblivious signatures, are proposed. In the first, the recipient can choose one and only one of n keys to get a message signed without revealing to the signer with which key the message is signed. In the second, the recipient can choose one and only one of n messages to be signed without revealing to the signer on which message the signature is made.

Key words

oblivious signatures 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lidong Chen
    • 1
  1. 1.Aarhus UniversityDenmark

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