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Metaphors create theories for users

  • Werner Kuhn
User-Interface
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 716)

Abstract

The notion of a spatial information theory is often understood in the sense of a theory underlying the design and implementation of geographic information systems (GIS). This paper offers a different perspective on spatial information theories, taking the point of view of people trying to solve spatial problems by using a GIS. It discerns a need for user level theories about spatial information and describes requirements for them. These requirements are then compared with various views on metaphors held in computer science and cognitive linguistics. It is concluded that a cognitive linguistics perspective on metaphors best matches the requirements for user level theories. Therefore, the user's needs for theories of spatial information should be dealt with by explicitly crafting metaphors to handle spatial information by human beings. The paper discusses traditional and possible future metaphor sources for spatial information handling tasks.

Keywords

Geographic Information System Spatial Information Spatial Theory Source Domain Flooding Zone 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Werner Kuhn
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of GeoinformationTechnical University ViennaViennaAustria

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