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The semantics of relations in 2D space using representative points: Spatial indexes

  • Dimitris Papadias
  • Timos Sellis
Data Models for Spatial and Temporal Data
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 716)

Abstract

The paper describes spatial indexes, a 2D array structure which can be used for the representation of spatial information. A spatial index preserves only a set of spatial relations of interest, called the modelling space, and discards visual information (such as shape, size etc.) and information about irrelevant spatial relations. Every relation in the modelling space can be defined using a set of special points, called the representative points. By filling the index array cells with representative points we can gain adequate expressive power to answer queries regarding the spatial relations of the modelling space without the need to access the initial image or an object database.

Keywords

Modelling Space Direction Relation Spatial Relation Construction Process Initial Image 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dimitris Papadias
    • 1
  • Timos Sellis
    • 1
  1. 1.Computer Science Division Department of Electrical and Computer EngineeringNational Technical University of AthensZographou, AthensGreece

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