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Action calculi, or syntactic action structures

  • Robin Milner
Invited Lectures
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 711)

Abstract

Action structures have previously been proposed as an algebra for both the syntax and the semantics of interactive computation. Here a class of concrete action structures called action calculi is identified, which can serve as a non-linear syntax for a wide variety of models of interactive behaviour. They generalise a previously defined action structure PIC for the π-calculus. One action calculus differs from another only in its generators, called controls.

Several extensions to PIC are given as action calculi, giving essentially the same power as the π-calculus. An action calculus is also outlined for PT nets — a class of Petti nets — parametrized upon their places and transitions.

Finally, action calculi are characterized as the free algebras in a sub-variety of action structures, namely those which satisfy certain additional axioms.

Keywords

Action Structure Computer Science Department Control Rule Control Role Communicate Sequential Process 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robin Milner
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory for Foundations of Computer Science Computer Science DepartmentUniversity of EdinburghEdinburghUK

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