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Optimal primary-backup protocols

  • Navin Budhiraja
  • Keith Marzullo
  • Fred B. Schneider
  • Sam Toueg
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 647)

Abstract

We give primary-backup protocols for various models of failure. These protocols are optimal with respect to degree of replication, failover time, and response time to client requests.

Keywords

Failure Model Link Failure Client Request Message Loss Crash Failure 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Navin Budhiraja
    • 1
  • Keith Marzullo
    • 1
  • Fred B. Schneider
    • 1
  • Sam Toueg
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Computer ScienceCornell UniversityIthacaUSA

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