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Paragon specifications: Structure, analysis and implementation

  • Paul Anderson
  • David Bolton
  • Paul Kelly
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 605)

Abstract

Paragon is a notation for specifying object behaviours using sets of rewrite rules, where rewriting is controlled by synchronous and asynchronous message passing, and where objects may be dynamically created as a rewriting side-effect. This paper overviews Paragon, and introduces a simple classification scheme for analysis of Paragon specifications. Restrictions on specifications are discussed in consideration of implementation feasibility and efficiency constraints. Implementation schemes based on the analysis and restrictions are defined. In particular, a translation strategy for static systems is detailed and motivated with a worked example. To reinforce the low-level nature of the derived implementation the translation is defined in terms of a digital hardware description language. Schemes for the implementation of general dynamic systems are also considered.

Keywords

Priority Queue Garbage Collection Asynchronous Message General Dynamic System Task Pool 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paul Anderson
    • 1
  • David Bolton
    • 2
  • Paul Kelly
    • 3
  1. 1.Grammatech Inc.IthacaUSA
  2. 2.Department of Computer ScienceCity UniversityLondon
  3. 3.Department of ComputingImperial College of Science, Technology and MedicineLondon

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