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On the average time complexity of set partitioning

  • Ewald Speckenmeyer
  • Rainer Kemp
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 440)

Abstract

The average running time of backtracking for solving the set-partitioning problem under two probability models, the constant set size model and the constant occurence model, will be studied. Results separating classes of instances with an exponential from such with a polynomial running time in the average will be shown.

Keywords

Conjunctive Normal Form Boolean Formula Average Running Time Satisfiability Problem Input Collection 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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6. References

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    R. Kemp. Manuscript. 1989Google Scholar
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    H.S. Wilf. Some examples of combinatorial averaging. The American Math. Monthly, 92, 250–261, 1985Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ewald Speckenmeyer
    • 1
  • Rainer Kemp
    • 2
  1. 1.FB InformatikUniversität DortmundGermany
  2. 2.FB InformatikUniversität Frankfurt/MGermany

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