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Deductive mathematical databases — A case study

  • Greg Butler
  • Sridhar S. Iyer
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 420)

Abstract

The application of Prolog and the associated technology of deductive databases to modern algebra is a novel concept. A relatively small, yet diverse, collection of information was chosen for a feasibility study. The character tables of the 56 non-abelian simple groups of order less than one million have been studied in depth, so the information is readily available. The information is very heterogeneous in nature, involving formulae, tables, lists, arbitrary precision integers, character strings, irrational numbers, and rules for deducing information from the given facts. Issues involved in the setting up of this database are presented. An experiment on the construction of all fusion maps among the groups was performed and the results analysed.

Keywords

Conjugacy Class Simple Group Rational Class Character Table Deductive Database 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Greg Butler
    • 1
  • Sridhar S. Iyer
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Computer ScienceUniversity of SydneySydneyAustralia

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