Advertisement

Smart Cards — Requirements, Properties, and Applications

  • Klaus Vedder
  • Franz Weikmann
Chapter
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1528)

Abstract

Smart cards play an increasing role as “active” security devices. Due to its microcomputer and programmable memory, a smart card can cater for the specific needs of the environment it is used in. Smart cards allow the secure handling and storage of sensitive data such as user privileges and cryptographic keys as well as the execution of cryptographic algorithms. They are secure tokens by means of which a user can be identified and authenticate a computer system or communication network and vice versa. This paper provides a comprehensive introduction into the features of chip cards, the principals of their operating system, their life-cycle and the standards governing them. It also includes a brief discussion of major applications and an outlook on the future development.

Keywords

Smart Card Central Processing Unit Random Access Memory Personal Identification Number Java Virtual Machine 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. [1]
    CEN Draft ENV 1375-2: Identification card systems-Intersector integrated circuit(s) card additional formats-Part-2: ID-00 Card size and physical characteristics.Google Scholar
  2. [2]
    Data Encryption Standard (DES). Federal Information Processing Standards Publication 46, National Bureau of Standards 1977.Google Scholar
  3. [3]
    EMV’ 96, Specification for Payment Systems, EUROPAY, MasterCard and VISA, version 3.0, June 1996.Google Scholar
  4. [4]
    EN 726-3:1994, Identification card systems-Telecommunication(s) integrated circuit(s) cards and terminals-Part 3: Application independent card requirements.Google Scholar
  5. [5]
    GSM 11.11 (ETS 300 608), Digital cellular telecommunications system (Phase 2); Specification of the Subscriber Identity Module-Mobile Equipment (SIM-ME) interface. GSM 11.11 (ETS 300 977), Digital cellular telecommunications system (Phase 2+); Specification of the Subscriber Identity Module-Mobile Equipment (SIM-ME) interface.Google Scholar
  6. [6]
    GSM 11.12 (ETS 300 641), Digital cellular telecommunications system (Phase 2); Specification of the 3 Volt Subscriber Identity Module-Mobile Equipment (SIM-ME) interface.Google Scholar
  7. [7]
    GSM 11.14, Digital cellular telecommunications system (Phase 2+); Specification of the SIM Application Toolkit for the Subscriber Identity Module-Mobile Equipment (SIM-ME) interface.Google Scholar
  8. [8]
    ISO/IEC 7810 (2nd edition): 1995, Information technology-Identification cards-Physical characteristics.Google Scholar
  9. [9]
    ISO/IEC 7811 (2nd edition): 1995, Information technology-Identification cards-Recording technique.Google Scholar
  10. [10]
    ISO/IEC 7813 (3rd edition): 1990, Information technology-Identification cards-Financial transaction cards.Google Scholar
  11. [12]
    ISO 10202-1: 1991: Banking, securities and other financial services-Financial transaction cards: Security architecture of financial transaction systems using integrated circuit cards-Part 1: Card life cycle.Google Scholar
  12. [13]
    M. Paterson, Secure Single Chip Microcomputer Manufacture, in: D. Chaum (ed.), Smart Card 2000, North Holland 1991, 29–37.Google Scholar
  13. [14]
    STARCOS S2.1, Reference Manual, 10/96, Giesecke & Devrient GmbH, Munich.Google Scholar
  14. [15]
    J. Svigals, Smart Cards. The ultimate personal computer. Mac Millan Publ. 1985.Google Scholar
  15. [16]
    K. Vedder, GSM: Security, Services and the SIM, this volume, pp. 227–243.Google Scholar
  16. [17]
    P. Wayner, Sun Gambles on Java Chips, in: Byte Nov. 1996, 79–88.Google Scholar
  17. [18]
    F. Weikmann, Chipkarten-Entwicklungsstand und weitere Perspektiven, in: PIK 1/93, 28–34.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Klaus Vedder
    • 1
  • Franz Weikmann
    • 1
  1. 1.Giesecke & Devrient GmbHMünchenGermany

Personalised recommendations