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An Automatic Registration Algorithm for Two Overlapping Range Images

  • Gerhard Roth
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1689)

Abstract

This paper describes a method of automatically performing the registration of two range images that have significant overlap. We first find points of interest in the intensity data that comes with each range image. Then we perform a tetrahedrization of the 3D range points associated with these 2D interest points. The triangle pairs of these tetrahedrizations are then matched in order to compute the registration. The fact that we have 3D data available makes it possible to effciently prune potential matches. The best match is the one that aligns the largest number of interest points between the two images. The algorithms are demonstrated experimentally on a number of different range image pairs.

Keywords

Feature Point Interest Point Range Image Iterative Close Point Interest Operator 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gerhard Roth
    • 1
  1. 1.Visual Information Technology GroupNational Research Council of Canada, OttawaCanada

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