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A Triptych Software Development Paradigm: Domain, Requirements and Software Towards a Nodel Development of a Decision Support System for Sustainable Development

  • Dines Bjørner
Chapter
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1710)

Abstract

A paradigmatic three stage approach to software development is sketched in terms of a torso-like, but schematic development of informal and formal descriptions (i) of the domain of sustainable development, (ii) of requirements to decision support software for developing models for and monitoring development (claimed to be sustainable), and (iii) of rudiments of a software architecture for such a system. In “one bat we tackle three problems”: (i) illustrating a fundamental approach to separation of concerns in software development: From domain via requirements to software descriptions; (ii) contributing towards a theory of sustainable development: Bringing some precision to many terms fraught by “political correctness”; and (iii) providing, we believe, a proper way of relating geographic information system+demographic information system systems to decision support software. Perhaps a fourth result of this paper can be claimed: (iv) Showing, as we believe it does, the structural main parts of a proper presentation of software.

Keywords

Sustainable Development Decision Support System Software Architecture Equity Function Geographic Information System 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dines Bjørner
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Information TechnologyThe Technical University of DenmarkLyngbyDenmark

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