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Exons and Code Growth in Genetic Programming

  • Terence Soule
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 2278)

Abstract

Current theories regarding code growth (bloat) in genetic programming focus on the presence and growth of introns. In this paper we show for the first time that code growth can occur, albeit quite slowly, even in code that has a significant impact on fitness.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Terence Soule
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Computer ScienceUniversity of IdahoMoscowUSA

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