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Transaction-Based Charging in Mnemosyne: A Peer-to-Peer Steganographic Storage System

  • Timothy Roscoe
  • Steven Hand
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 2376)

Abstract

Mnemosyne is a peer-to-peer steganographic storage system: one in which the existence of a user’s files cannot be verified without a key. This paper applies the techniques used in Mnemosyne — erasure codes and anonymous block writing — to move most of the administrative overhead of a commercial storage service over to the client, resulting in cost savings for the service provider.

The contribution of this paper is to present a radically alternative way of charging for storage services. In place of renting some amount of space for some period of time, systems like Mnemosyne allow more flexible billing models closer to those proposed for network bandwidth, including versions of congestion pricing. We show how a reliable, commercial storage service using is feasible, and examine the details of the tradeoff it offers compared with conventional storage services.

Keywords

Distribute Hash Table Storage Service Store Size Congestion Price Erasure Code 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Timothy Roscoe
    • 1
  • Steven Hand
    • 2
  1. 1.Intel ResearchBerkeleyUSA
  2. 2.University of Cambridge Computer LaboratoryCambridgeUK

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