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Worlds Apart: Exclusion-Processes in DDS

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Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS,volume 2362)

Abstract

More and more interfaces are designed for ‘everybody’, instead of with a specific user-group in mind. In practice, most of them are still used by the ‘typical Internet-user’, the highly educated, white young male with extensive computer and Internet-experience. Amsterdam-based digital city DDS is no exception to this rule. In this article, the interface of DDS is studied with the help of ten first-time users with a more diverse background. Did they face any barriers in using DDS? And what kind of work did they need to perform to use the interface? This study shows that the most serious problems the first-time users faced were not caused by a lack of skill, but by the different technological frame they had. Thus, a script-analysis with the help of ‘outsiders’ seems to be an effective way to uncover some exclusion-processes of a digital city.

Keywords

  • Potential User
  • Public Transportation
  • Time User
  • Diverse Background
  • Technical Object

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

I would like to thank Ellen van Oost, Sally Wyatt, Anne Sofie Laegran, Nelly Oudshoorn, Agnes Bolso and participants from the Lomskole, the EMTEL-network and three anonymous referees for their helpful comments on earlier versions of this article. I also would like to thank the designers, users and first-time users of DDS who gave me their time and the opportunity to interview them.

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© 2002 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg

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Rommes, E. (2002). Worlds Apart: Exclusion-Processes in DDS. In: Tanabe, M., van den Besselaar, P., Ishida, T. (eds) Digital Cities II: Computational and Sociological Approaches. Digital Cities 2001. Lecture Notes in Computer Science, vol 2362. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg. https://doi.org/10.1007/3-540-45636-8_17

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/3-540-45636-8_17

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  • Publisher Name: Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg

  • Print ISBN: 978-3-540-43963-9

  • Online ISBN: 978-3-540-45636-0

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