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TrekTrack: A Round Wristwatch Interface for SMS Authoring

  • Anders Kirkeby
  • Rasmus Zacho
  • Jock Mackinlay
  • Polle Zellweger
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 2201)

Abstract

The user interface for text messaging via SMS has changed little since the technology was introduced on cell phones. Authoring text with a phone keypad is tedious and error-prone. Furthermore, the cell phone intrudes into other activities while hands hold it for authoring. In this paper we suggest a future alternative user interface for SMS messages based on a round wristwatch device. Two button-wheels are used to access a round hi-res color display. Text input is done with a round soft keyboard that maps intuitively to the button-wheels using the angular and radial movements of polar coordinates. Furthermore, a wristwatch device has an aesthetics that is less intrusive than a cell phone. Since the device is always deployed, authoring is easily interrupted to use the hands for other tasks. Informal user evaluation of a prototype implementation suggests that this novel round design provides an improved user experience for authoring SMS compared to cell phones.

Keywords

Mobile computing round display polar coordinate navigation SMS text entry input devices wheel interface angular movement radial movement 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anders Kirkeby
    • 1
  • Rasmus Zacho
    • 1
  • Jock Mackinlay
    • 1
  • Polle Zellweger
    • 1
  1. 1.University of AarhusDenmark

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