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KISS the Tram: Exploring the PDA as Support for Everyday Activities

  • Thorstein Lunde
  • Arve Larsen
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 2201)

Abstract

Most of today’s common PDA applications do not leverage the prospects of the PDA. We want to explore PDAs and other mobile devices as new media, focusing on their unique qualities, not as limited PCs. Moreover, we focus on support for everyday life. We present a user test of an application for catching the tram based on this approach, as well as guidance from the ever relevant principle “Keep it simple, stupid!”

Keywords

Mobile Device Personal Digital Assistant Everyday Activity Ubiquitous Computing Subway Station 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thorstein Lunde
    • 1
  • Arve Larsen
    • 1
  1. 1.Norwegian Computing Center (NR)OsloNorway

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