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A Classification of Web Adaptivity: Tailoring Content and Navigational Systems of Advanced Web Applications

  • Arno Scharl
Chapter
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 2016)

Abstract

All texts and, more specifically, their electronically distributed variations are multimodally articulated, integrating language, spatial arrangements, visual elements, and other semiotic modes [1]. Users usually have varying preferences regarding multimodal access representations or differing capacities to make use of them [2]. The number of alternatives provided by paper-based media is inherently limited. Adaptive hypertext applications do not share this limitation. This paper reviews popular methods and classifies them into three categories of information and their corresponding interface representation: Content of documents, primary navigational system (comprising links between and within these documents), and supplemental navigational systems (e.g., index pages, trails, guided tours, local and global maps).

Keywords

Adaptivity Annotations Navigational System User Modeling Classification 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Arno Scharl
    • 1
  1. 1.Information Systems DepartmentVienna University of Economics & Business AdministrationViennaAustria

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