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New Developments in Ada 95 Run-Time Profile Definitions and Language Refinements

  • Joyce L. Tokar
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 2043)

Abstract

The Ada 95 Programming Language [1] was designed to meet the needs of a variety of programming domains. The Ada 95 Special Needs Annexes provided the standard definition of the facilities required for special areas of use such as Systems Programming, Real-Time and Safety Critical domains. As the user community began to put the profiles defined in these Annexes to use, the need for new profiles emerged. The first such profile, Ravenscar, was defined as part of the work conducted at the 8th and 9th International Real-Time Ada Workshop (IRTAW-8 and IRTAW-9). This paper will present the latest refinement to the Ravenscar profile as modified at the IRTAW-10. Additional proposals for enhancements to Ada 95 to meet other needs of the real-time community will be described briefly. The concluding comments will provide some insight into the future of the Ada Programming Language with respect to support for special needs in the domains of real-time and high-integrity programming.

Keywords

Exception Handling Storage Pool Dynamic Priority Protected Object Interrupt Handler 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joyce L. Tokar
    • 1
  1. 1.PhoenixUSA

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