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Emergence of Collective Behavior in Evolving Populations of Flying Agents

  • Lee Spector
  • Jon Klein
  • Chris Perry
  • Mark Feinstein
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 2723)

Abstract

We demonstrate the emergence of collective behavior in two evolutionary computation systems, one an evolutionary extension of a classic (highly constrained) flocking algorithm and the other a relatively un-constrained system in which the behavior of agents is governed by evolved computer programs. We describe the systems in detail, document the emergence of collective behavior, and argue that these systems present new opportunities for the study of group dynamics in an evolutionary context.

Keywords

Sharing Condition Food Sharing Simulation Time Step Swarm System Optimal Group Size 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lee Spector
    • 1
  • Jon Klein
    • 1
    • 2
  • Chris Perry
    • 1
  • Mark Feinstein
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Cognitive ScienceHampshire CollegeAmherstUSA
  2. 2.Physical Resource TheoryChalmers U. of Technology and Göteborg UniversityGöteborgSweden

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