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Finite-State Molecular Computing

  • Olgierd Unold
  • Maciej Troć
  • Tadeusz Dobosz
  • Alicja Trusewicz
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 2759)

Abstract

In this paper we explore the molecular computation model based on a splicing system and implemented in vitro by Shapiro. This paper presents two implementations, one implementing an FSA with two states, and the other one with three states, using enzymes BseMII and BseXI, respectively, which are different from only the one — FokI — used by Shapiro, et al. for their two-state FSA. The model of three-state, two-input symbol machine supports 1.835.001 syntactically distinct programs in comparison with 765 programs in Shapiro’s approach.

Keywords

Turing Machine Transition Rule Finite Automaton Finite State Automaton Splice System 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. [1]
    Benenson, Y., Paz-Elitzur, T., Adar, R., Keinan, E., Livneh, Z. and Shapiro, E.: Programmable Computing Machine Made of Biomolecules, Nature 414 (2001) 430–434CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. [2]
    Head, T.: Formal Language Theory and DNA: an Analysis of the Generative Capacity of Specific Recombinant Behaviors. Bull. Math. Biol. 49 (1987) 6, 737-759MathSciNetGoogle Scholar
  3. [3]
    Unold, O., Troć, M.: Restriction Enzyme Computation, 7th International Work-Conference on Artificial and Natural Neural Networks, IWANN 2003, Lecture Notes in Computer Science (2003) (to appear)Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Olgierd Unold
    • 1
  • Maciej Troć
    • 1
  • Tadeusz Dobosz
    • 2
  • Alicja Trusewicz
    • 2
  1. 1.Institute of Engineering CyberneticsWroclaw University of TechnologyWroclawPoland
  2. 2.Institute of Forensic MedicineMedical UniversityWroclawPoland

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