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Representing Agent Interaction Protocols in UML

  • James J. Odell
  • H. Van Dyke Parunak
  • Bernhard Bauer
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1957)

Abstract

Gaining wide acceptance for the use of agents in industry requires both relating it to the nearest antecedent technology (object- oriented software development) and using artifacts to support the development environment throughout the full system lifecycle. We address both of these requirements using AUML, the Agent UML (Unified Modeling Language)-a set of UML idioms and extensions. This paper illustrates the approach by presenting a three-layer AUML representation for agent interaction protocols: templates and packages to represent the protocol as a whole; sequence and collaboration diagrams to capture inter-agent dynamics; and activity diagrams and state charts to capture both intra-agent and inter-agent dynamics.

Keywords

Unify Modeling Language Multiagent System Sequence Diagram Object Constraint Language Activity Diagram 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • James J. Odell
    • 1
  • H. Van Dyke Parunak
    • 2
  • Bernhard Bauer
    • 3
  1. 1.James Odell AssociatesAnn ArborUSA
  2. 2.ERIM Center for Electronic CommerceAnn ArborUSA
  3. 3.Siemens, ZT IK 6MünchenGermany

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