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Agent-Oriented Software Engineering: The State of the Art

  • Michael Wooldridgey
  • Paolo Ciancarini
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1957)

Abstract

Software engineers continually strive to develop tools and techniques to manage the complexity that is inherent in software systems. In this article, we argue that intelligent agents and multi-agent systems are just such tools. We begin by reviewing what is meant by the term “agent”, and contrast agents with objects.We then go on to examine a number of prototype techniques proposed for engineering agent systems, including methodologies for agent-oriented analysis and design, formal specification and verification methods for agent systems, and techniques for implementing agent specifications.

Keywords

Model Check Temporal Logic Multiagent System Agent System Intelligent Agent 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael Wooldridgey
    • 1
  • Paolo Ciancarini
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Computer ScienceUniversity of LiverpoolUK
  2. 2.Dipartimento di Scienze dell’InformazioneUniversity of Bologna BolognaItaly

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