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Domain Requirements for a Cybertext Authoring System

  • Jim Rosenberg
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1903)

Abstract

This paper presents requirements for a cybertext authoring system in the literary domain. Issues discussed include a drawing framework; pluggable objects; openness to a variety of different types of structure, including piles, relations, sets, links, and composites; flexible behavior (extensibility and tailorability); dependency control; non-binary file formats for export and import; web-enabled player; and portability. Issues relevant to structural computing appear throughout, as structural computing is the only paradigm likely to support all of these requirements.

Keywords

Structural Computing Authoring System Portable Document Format Dependency Control Document Author 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jim Rosenberg
    • 1
  1. 1.Grindstone

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