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MSC Connectors - The Philosopher’s Stone

  • Peter Graubmann
  • Ekkart Rudolph
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 2599)

Abstract

Component oriented modelling by means of Message Sequence Charts requires new language constructs for an adequate description of the component communication. The communication between parts of a system, i.e., its components, follows interaction patterns which are expressed in the component oriented world as software connectors. The employment of MSCs for the description of both, connectors and components, has turned out to be a very promising concept. In analogy to decomposed instances, MSC connectors may be viewed also as High Level messages for the refinement of the communication behaviour, a construct which is still missing in the MSC language. The communication of MSC components via MSC connectors is suitably defined by means of the matching of component and connector interface descriptions, thereby, employing a partitioning of the component environment description. The matching procedure between MSC components and MSC connectors can be described by means of a partial order semantics.

Keywords

Message Sequence Charts (MSC) MSC Connector Component Component Oriented Software Development System Family Engineering Interface Compositionality Interface Protocol 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter Graubmann
    • 1
  • Ekkart Rudolph
    • 2
  1. 1.Siemens AG, Corporate TechnologySoftware and EngineeringMünchenGermany
  2. 2.Institut für InformatikTechnische Universität MünchenMünchenGermany

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