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Architectural Support for Global Smart Spaces

  • Alan Dearle
  • Graham Kirby
  • Ron Morrison
  • Andrew McCarthy
  • Kevin Mullen
  • Yanyan Yang
  • Richard Connor
  • Paula Welen
  • Andy Wilson
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 2574)

Abstract

A GLObal Smart Space (GLOSS) provides support for interaction amongst people, artefacts and places while taking account of both context and movement on a global scale. Crucial to the definition of a GLOSS is the provision of a set of location-aware services that detect, convey, store and exploit location information. We use one of these services, hearsay, to illustrate the implementation dimensions of a GLOSS. The focus of the paper is on both local and global software architecture to support the implementation of such services. The local architecture is based on XML pipelines and is used to construct location -aware components. The global architecture is based on a hybrid peer-to- peer routing scheme and provides the local architectures with the means to communicate in the global context.

Keywords

Overlay Network Location Detection Smart Space Architectural Support IEEE Internet Computing 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alan Dearle
    • 1
  • Graham Kirby
    • 1
  • Ron Morrison
    • 1
  • Andrew McCarthy
    • 1
  • Kevin Mullen
    • 1
  • Yanyan Yang
    • 1
  • Richard Connor
    • 2
  • Paula Welen
    • 2
  • Andy Wilson
    • 2
  1. 1.School of Computer ScienceUniversity of St AndrewsFifeScotland
  2. 2.Department of Computer ScienceUniversity of StrathclydeGlasgowScotland

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