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Simulating DNA Computing

  • Sanjeev Baskiyar
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 2552)

Abstract

Although DNA (deoxy-ribo nucleic acid) can perform 10 22 computations per second, it is time intensive and complex to set up input and output of data to and from a biological computer and to filter the final result. This paper, discusses how to simulate DNA computing on a digital computer to solve the Hamiltonian path problem using Adleman’s model. The simulation serves as an educational tool to teach DNA computing without the elaborate bio-experiments. As an aside, it also digitally verifies Adleman’s notion of DNA computing to solve the Hamiltonian path problem. Future work will involve a parallel implementation of the algorithm and investigation of the possibility of construction of simple regular VLSI structures to implement the basics of the model for fixed-sized problems.

Keywords

Parallel Computing DNA Hamiltonian path Simulation Educational tool 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sanjeev Baskiyar
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of C.Sci. and Soft.Eng.Auburn UniversityAuburn

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