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Visual Explorations for the Alexandria Digital Earth Prototype

  • Dan Ancona
  • Mike Freeston
  • Terry Smith
  • Sara Fabrikant
Chapter
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 2539)

Abstract

The Alexandria Digital Earth Prototype project addresses issues of access, browsing, delivery and understanding of georeferenced library items. Two visualization approaches that address these issues in different ways are under development: interfaces between some existing digital earth systems and the digital library, and spatial but nongeoreferenced information spaces. Both the abstract spatial and georeferenced projects are being evaluated for their educational potential in classroom and lectures, in labs and as tools for students to use on their own.

Keywords

Digital Library Concept Space Visual Exploration Visual Interface Personal Collection 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dan Ancona
    • 1
  • Mike Freeston
    • 1
  • Terry Smith
    • 1
  • Sara Fabrikant
    • 2
  1. 1.Alexandria Digital Earth PrototypeUSA
  2. 2.Department of GeographyUCSBUSA

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