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Reading Speed and Superiority of Right Visual Field on Foveated Vision

  • Yukio Ishihara
  • Satoru Morita
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 2525)

Abstract

In this paper, we call the point on an object where human looks a subjective viewpoint and we call the point where the object and the straight line going through the center of pupil and the center of the fovea crosses an objective viewpoint. We realize eye movements in reading on the computer when an objective viewpoint is a subjective viewpoint and when an objective viewpoint is shifted to the right of a subjective viewpoint and we investigate the characteristics of eye movements. First, we realize a computer-simulation of human eye movements in reading. Secondly, the superiority of the right visual field appears in the foveated vision realized by shifting an objective viewpoint to the right of a subjective viewpoint. And we confirm that the gap between the subjective viewpoint and the objective viewpoint is important by comparing the characteristics of human eye movements to the characteristics of eye movements when an objective viewpoint is shifted to the right of a subjective viewpoint. Furthermore, we perform eye movements on the computer while shifting an objective viewpoint to the right of a subjective viewpoint and measure the speed at which an English sentence is read. We conclude that reading speed when the foveated vision has the superiority of the right visual field is faster than that when the foveated vision doesn’t have it.

Keywords

Word Recognition Test Word Reading Speed Edge Pixel Letter Recognition 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yukio Ishihara
    • 1
  • Satoru Morita
    • 1
  1. 1.Faculty of EngineeringYamaguchi UniversityUbeJAPAN

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