Antarctica pp 109-116 | Cite as

ADMAP — A Digital Magnetic Anomaly Map of the Antarctic

  • Alexander Golynsky
  • Massimo Chiappini
  • Detlef Damaske
  • Fausto Ferraccioli
  • Carol A. Finn
  • Takemi Ishihara
  • Hyung Rae Kim
  • Luis Kovacs
  • Valery N. Masolov
  • Peter Morris
  • Ralph von Frese

Abstract

For a number of years the multi-national ADMAP working group has been compiling near surface and satellite magnetic data in the region south of 60° S. By the end of 2000, a 5 km grid of magnetic anomalies was produced for the entire region. The map readily portrays the first-order magnetic differences between oceanic and continental regions. The magnetic anomaly pattern over the continent reflects many phases of geological history whilst that over the abyssal plains of the surrounding oceans is dominated mostly by patterns of linear seafloor spreading anomalies and fracture zones. The Antarctic compilation reveals terranes of varying ages, including Proterozoic-Archaean cratons, Proterozoic-Palaeozoic mobile belts, Palaeozoic-Cenozoic magmatic arc systems and other important crustal features. The map delineates intra-continental rifts and major rifts along the Antarctic continental margin, the regional extent of plutons and volcanics, such as the Ferrar dolerites and Kirkpatrick basalts. The magnetic anomaly map of the Antarctic together with other geological and geophysical information provides new perspectives on the break-up of Gondwana and Rodinia evolution.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alexander Golynsky
    • 1
  • Massimo Chiappini
    • 2
  • Detlef Damaske
    • 3
  • Fausto Ferraccioli
    • 4
  • Carol A. Finn
    • 5
  • Takemi Ishihara
    • 6
  • Hyung Rae Kim
    • 7
  • Luis Kovacs
    • 8
  • Valery N. Masolov
    • 9
  • Peter Morris
    • 10
  • Ralph von Frese
    • 7
  1. 1.VNIIOkeangeologiaSt.-PetersburgRussia
  2. 2.INGVRomaItaly
  3. 3.Bundesanstalt für Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe, BGRHannoverGermany
  4. 4.DIPTERIS Università di GenovaGenovaItaly
  5. 5.U.S. Geological SurveyDenverUSA
  6. 6.Geological Survey of JapanIbarakiJapan
  7. 7.Ohio State UniversityColumbusUSA
  8. 8.NRLWashington, DCUSA
  9. 9.PMGRELomonosovRussia
  10. 10.British Antarctic Survey, BASCambridgeUK

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