Advertisement

Dynamics of Planetary Rings

  • Bruno Sicardy
Part of the Lecture Notes in Physics book series (LNP, volume 682)

Abstract

Planetary rings are found around all four giant planets of our solar system. These collisional and highly flattened disks exhibit a whole wealth of physical processes involving microscopic dust grains, as well as meter-sized boulders. These processes, together with ring composition, can help to understand better the formation and evolution of proto-satellite and proto-planetary disks in the early solar system. The present chapter reviews some fundamental aspects of ring dynamics, namely their flattening, their stability against proper modes, their particle sizes, and their responses to resonance forcing by satellites. These concepts will be used and tested during the forthcoming exploration of the Saturn system by the Cassini mission.

Keywords

Velocity Dispersion Giant Planet Early Solar System Planetary Ring Tidal Disruption 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    P. Goldreich, S. Tremaine: Ann. Rev. Astron. Astrophys. 20, 249 (1982) CrossRefADSGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    N. Borderies, P. Goldreich, S. Tremaine: unsolved problems in planetary ring dynamics. In: Planetary rings, ed by R. Greenberg, A. Brahic (Univ. Of Arizona Press 1984) pp 713–734 Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    P.D. Nicholson, L. Dones: Rev. Geophys. 29, 313 (1991) ADSGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    P. Goldreich: puzzles and prospects in planetary ring dynamics. In: Chaos, resonance and collective dynamical phenomena in the solar system, ed by S. Ferraz- Mello (Kluwer Academic Publishers, Dordrecht Boston London 1992) pp 65–73 Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    L.W. Esposito: Annu. Rev. Earth Planet. Sci. 21, 487 (1993) CrossRefADSGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    J.N. Cuzzi: Earth, Moon, and Planets 67, 179 (1995) CrossRefADSGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    A.W. Harris: the origin and evolution of planetary rings. In: Planetary rings, ed by R. Greenberg, A. Brahic (Univ. Of Arizona Press 1984) pp 641–659 Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    W. Ward: the solar nebula and the planetesimal disk. In: Planetary rings, ed by R. Greenberg, A. Brahic (Univ. Of Arizona Press 1984) pp 660–684 Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    A. Toomre: ApJ. 139, 1217 (1964) CrossRefADSGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    J. Binney, S. Tremaine: Galactic Dynamics (Princeton University Press 1988) Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    P.Y. Longaretti: Planetary ring dynamics: from Boltzmann’s equation to celestial dynamics. In: Interrelations between physics and dynamics for minor bodies in the solar system, ed by D. Benest, C. Froeschlé (Editions Frontières, Gif-sur- Yvette 1992) pp 453–586 Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    F.H. Shu: waves in planetary rings. In: Planetary rings, ed by R. Greenberg, A. Brahic (Univ. of Arizona Press 1984) pp 513–561 Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    N. Meyer-Vernet, B. Sicardy: Icarus 69, 157 (1987) CrossRefADSGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    B. Sicardy: Planetary ring dynamics: Secular exchange of angular momentum and energy with a satellite. In: Interrelations between physics and dynamics for minor bodies in the solar system, ed by D. Benest, C. Froeschlé (Editions Frontières, Gif-sur-Yvette 1992) pp 631–651 Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bruno Sicardy
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Observatoire de ParisFrance
  2. 2.Université Pierre et Marie CurieFrance

Personalised recommendations