Advertisement

Prevention of Relapse Following Cleftal Bone Grafting and the Future Use of BMP Cytokines to Regenerate Osseous Clefts Without Grafting

  • Philip J. Boyne
  • Alan S. Herford
  • Dale E. Stringer

27.11 Summary

With appropriate early grafting of the cleft palate child and stimulation of the graft orthodontically and orthopedically, later orthognathic surgical procedures can be avoided and the incidence of the relapse can be greatly diminished. If appropriate treatment protocols are followed, relapse and the loss of control of the premaxilla, deficiencies in growth of the premaxilla, and other functional impairments can be avoided.

Additionally, the future appears to be very exciting in the area of developing improved methods of restoration and rehabilitation of the osseous cleft palate patient involving genetic engineering resulting in minimizing complications and long-term relapse.

Keywords

Bone Grafting Orthodontic Treatment Central Incisor Posterior Arch Orthognathic Surgery 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Boyne PJ, Sands NR. Secondary bone grafting of residual alveolar and palatal clefts. J Oral Surg 1972; 30:85–93.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Boyne PJ. The use of marrow cancellous bone grafts in maxillary alveolar and palatal clefts. J Dent Res 1974; 14:821–824.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Boyne PJ, Sands NR. Combined orthodontic-surgical management of residual palato-alveolar cleft defects. Am J Orthod 1976; 70:20–37.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Hogeman KE, Jacobsson S, Sarnas CN. Secondary bone grafting in the cleft palate. Cleft Palate J 1972; 9:39–42.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Johanson B, Ohlsson A. Bone grafting and dental orthopedics in primary and secondary cases of cleft lip and palate. Acta Chir Scand 1961; 122–112.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Boyne PJ, Scheer PM. Longterm study of autogenously bone grafted bilateral alveolar clefts. In: Proceedings of the 4th International Symposium on Craniofacial Anomalies and Clefts of the Lip Alveolus and Palate. Hamburg, Germany, 1987. Stuttgart, Germany: Thieme-Verlag; 1991. p. 349–355.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Boyne PJ, Scheer PM. Longterm study of autogenously bone grafted unilateral alveolar clefts. In: Proceedings of the 4th International Symposium on Craniofacial Anomalies and Clefts of the Lip Alveolus and Palate. Hamburg, Germany, 1987. Stuttgart, Germany: Thieme-Verlag; 1991. p. 392–396.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Boyne PJ. Bone grafting in the osseous reconstruction of alveolar and palatal clefts. Oral Maxillofac Surg Clin North Am 1991; 3:588–597.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Precious DJ. Early secondary alveolar bone grafts (abstract). J Oral Maxillofac Surg 2003; (Suppl. 1) 61:43–44.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Rosenstein S, Kernahan D, Dado D, Grasseschi M, Griffith BH. Orthognathic surgery in cleft patients treated by early bone grafting. Plast Reconst Surg 1991; 87:835–892.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Enlow DH. Facial growth. 3rd edn. Philadelphia: WB Saunders; 1990. p. 117–123.Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Semb G, (ed.) Proceedings of the 4th International Symposium on Craniofacial Anomalies and Clefts of the Lip Alveolus, and Palate. Hamburg, Germany, 1987. Stuttgart, Germany: Thieme-Verlag; 1987. p. 296–301.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Philip J. Boyne
  • Alan S. Herford
  • Dale E. Stringer

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations