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Selecting an Optimal Production Order and Its Corresponding Configuration in a Reconfigurable Manufacturing System with Multiple Product Groups

  • K. Takahashi
  • K. Morikawa
  • T. Myreshka
  • T. Ohiro
  • A. Takubo
Chapter

Abstract

In the current market, demand from the customers varies to the highest degree. Consequently, manufacturers need to determine some new approaches that can lead to achieving higher production rates and/or reduce the production costs. In the past production systems, the facility layout, workers’ assignment and the function of each machine were held constant. Recently, Reconfigurable Manufacturing System (RMS) [1], a production system that allows the modification of the system configuration, such as facility layout, workers’ assignment and machine function, emerges. The improved efficiency of RMS to deal with the various demands from the customers can be expected.

Keywords

Arrival Rate Product Group Production Time Optimal Production System Configuration 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. Takahashi
  • K. Morikawa
  • T. Myreshka
  • T. Ohiro
  • A. Takubo

There are no affiliations available

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