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Structural determinants of leaf light-harvesting capacity and photosynthetic potentials

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Part of the Progress in Botany book series (BOTANY,volume 67)

Keywords

  • Leaf Size
  • Plant Cell Environ
  • Structural Determinant
  • Light Interception
  • Leaf Lamina

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Niinemets, Ü., Sack, L. (2006). Structural determinants of leaf light-harvesting capacity and photosynthetic potentials. In: Esser, K., Lüttge, U., Beyschlag, W., Murata, J. (eds) Progress in Botany. Progress in Botany, vol 67. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg. https://doi.org/10.1007/3-540-27998-9_17

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