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Biotechnology for Air Pollution Control — an Overview

  • Zarook Shareefdeen
  • Brian Herner
  • Ajay Singh
Chapter

Keywords

Membrane Bioreactor Elimination Capacity Odor Control Waste Management Association Methyl Mercaptan 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Zarook Shareefdeen
    • 1
  • Brian Herner
    • 1
  • Ajay Singh
    • 2
  1. 1.BIOREM TechnologiesGuelphCanada
  2. 2.Petrozyme TechnologiesGuelphCanada

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