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3D Geographic Visualization: The Marine GIS

  • Chris Gold
  • Michael Chau
  • Marcin Dzieszko
  • Rafel Goralski

Abstract

The objective of GIS and Spatial Data Handling is to view, query and manipulate a computer simulation of the real world. While we traditionally work with two-dimensional static maps, modern technology allows us to work with a three-dimensional dynamic environment. We have developed a generic graphics component which provides many of the tools necessary for developing 3D dynamic geographical applications. Our example application is a 3D “Pilot Book”, which is used to provide navigation assistance to ships entering Hong Kong harbour. We show some of the “Marine GIS” results, and mention several other applications.

Keywords

Voronoi Diagram Geometric Object Graphic Object Scene Graph Simulated World 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Chris Gold
    • 1
  • Michael Chau
    • 2
  • Marcin Dzieszko
    • 2
  • Rafel Goralski
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Land Surveying and Geo-InformaticsHong Kong Polytechnic UniversityHong Kong
  2. 2.Hong Kong Marine DepartmentHong Kong

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