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IGFS 2014 pp 39-44 | Cite as

Testing Airborne Gravity Data in the Large-Scale Area of Italy and Adjacent Seas

  • Riccardo BarzaghiEmail author
  • Alberta Albertella
  • Daniela Carrion
  • Franz Barthelmes
  • Svetozar Petrovic
  • Mirko Scheinert
Part of the International Association of Geodesy Symposia book series (IAG SYMPOSIA, volume 144)

Abstract

In 2012 the GEOHALO flight mission was carried out using the new German research aircraft HALO. The surveyed zone covers the Central-South part of Italy, roughly from latitude 36°N to 44°N. In this area, seven main tracks NW to SE were surveyed having a spacing of about 40 km and an altitude of 3,500 m, complemented by an eighth track in an altitude of 10,000 m. Four perpendicular cross tracks were also added.

Amongst the geodetic-geophysical equipment GEOHALO carried two gravimeters. In this paper we will focus on the GFZ instrument, a CHEKAN-AM gravimeter. The present investigation aims at defining the spectral properties and the level of precision of the observed gravity data. Comparisons with gravity anomalies predicted from Italian ground data are presented. The gravity field in the surveyed area as derived from these ground data is propagated to the aerogravimetry survey points and compared to the observed gravity anomalies. Upward continuation is performed using the remove-restore approach and collocation. High-resolution global geopotential models are compared with the observed data as well. The statistics of the gravity residuals show that the survey data fit the predicted gravity at 2–3 mGal standard deviation level which proves that a good standard has been reached. A trackwise analysis is also performed to check for possible local discrepancies between observed and predicted gravity.

Keywords

Aerogravimetry Collocation Remove-restore Global geopotential models 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Riccardo Barzaghi
    • 1
    Email author
  • Alberta Albertella
    • 1
  • Daniela Carrion
    • 1
  • Franz Barthelmes
    • 2
  • Svetozar Petrovic
    • 2
  • Mirko Scheinert
    • 3
  1. 1.DICA – Politecnico di MilanoMilanItaly
  2. 2.Helmholtz Centre Potsdam German Research Centre for Geosciences (GFZ)PotsdamGermany
  3. 3.Institut für Planetare Geodäsie, Technische Universität DresdenDresdenGermany

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