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Applying Service Composition in Digital Museum Grid

  • Xiangxu Meng
  • Shijun Liu
  • Rui Wang
  • Chenglei Yang
  • Hai Guo
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 3759)

Abstract

Digital museum is an effective method of protecting and using resources stored in museums. Digital museum grid was present to efficiently and effectively organize, present and share the resources over heterogeneous digital museum systems. In a service-oriented digital museum grid, by composing the services published to be entire applications dynamically, more interesting and individual applications would be created upon the massive and various collections. This paper present a three-phases service composition model includes functional modeling, service selecting and dynamic binding, in which all outputs of the three phases are reusable and express the service composition in different abstract levels. A service selection framework put forward in the paper presents a feasible method for service selecting. And a dynamic binding method based on service composition template and compositive evaluating is discussed which enhances the flexibility of service composition.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Xiangxu Meng
    • 1
  • Shijun Liu
    • 1
  • Rui Wang
    • 1
  • Chenglei Yang
    • 1
  • Hai Guo
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Computer Science and TechnologyShandong UniversityJinanChina

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