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HYDRA: From Cellular Biology to Shape-Changing Artefacts

  • Esben H. Østergaard
  • David J. Christensen
  • Peter Eggenberger
  • Tim Taylor
  • Peter Ottery
  • Henrik H. Lund
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 3696)

Abstract

The HYDRA work provides insight into the exploitation of holistic behavioural and morphological adaptation in the design of new artefacts. The potential of the new design principle has been exemplified through the construction of robotic systems that can change morphology. Two prototype building block systems has been developed, HYDRON for a fluid scenario, and ATRON for a terrestrial scenario. In the HYDRON case, the individual module can perform 3D motion and is able to arrange in clusters of specific formation without the necessity of physical connections. In the ATRON case, the modules are individually simpler, attach through physical connections, and perform 3D motions by collective actions. Control mechanisms identified from cellular biology has been successfully transferred to the physical building blocks.

Keywords

Robotic System Cellular Biology Chemical Gradient Morphological Adaptation Physical Connection 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Esben H. Østergaard
    • 1
  • David J. Christensen
    • 1
  • Peter Eggenberger
    • 2
  • Tim Taylor
    • 3
  • Peter Ottery
    • 3
  • Henrik H. Lund
    • 1
  1. 1.AdapTronics group, Maersk Mc-Kinney Moller Institute for Production TechnologyUniversity of Southern Denmark 
  2. 2.Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, Department of Information TechnologyUniversity of Zürich 
  3. 3.Mobile Robotics Research group, Institute of Perception, Action and BehaviourUniversity of Edinburgh 

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