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Emergence of Oriented Cell Assemblies Associated with Spike-Timing-Dependent Plasticity

  • Javier Iglesias
  • Jan Eriksson
  • Beatriz Pardo
  • Marco Tomassini
  • Alessandro E. P. Villa
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 3696)

Abstract

We studied the emergence of cell assemblies out of a locally connected random network of 10,000 integrate-and-fire units distributed on a 100×100 2D lattice. The network was composed of 80% excitatory and 20% inhibitory units with balanced excitatory/inhibitory synaptic weights. Excitatory–excitatory synapses were modified according to a spike-timing-dependent synaptic plasticity (STDP) rule associated with synaptic pruning. In presence of a stimulus and with independent random background noise (5 spikes/s), we observed that after 5·105 ms of simulated time, about 8% of the exc–exc connections remained active and were reinforced with respect to the initial strength. The projections that remained active after pruning tended to be oriented following a feed-forward converging–diverging pattern. This result suggests that topologies compatible with synfire chains may appear during unsupervised pruning processes.

Keywords

Input Unit Time Domain Analysis Discrete Time Step Spike Neural Network Synaptic Pruning 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Javier Iglesias
    • 1
    • 3
    • 4
  • Jan Eriksson
    • 3
  • Beatriz Pardo
    • 2
  • Marco Tomassini
    • 1
  • Alessandro E. P. Villa
    • 1
    • 3
    • 4
  1. 1.Information Systems DepartmentUniversity of LausanneSwitzerland
  2. 2.Centro de Biologia Molecular Severo OchoaUniversidad AutonomaMadridSpain
  3. 3.Laboratory of NeuroheuristicsUniversity of LausanneSwitzerland
  4. 4.Inserm U318, Laboratory of NeurobiophysicsUniversity Joseph FourierGrenobleFrance

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