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Introduction

Notes on Almost Nothing
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Introduction: Notes on Almost Nothing

  1. 1.
    H. T. Cadbury-Brown, “Ludwig Mies van der Rohe: An Address of Appreciation,” Architectural Association Journal 75, no. 834 (July–August 1959): 26–46. Mies’s statement on page 31 continues: “He [Lange] was the president of the silk industry in Germany, but that was to his sorrow. He drank a lot of wine, and so on. That is what you get.”Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Schulze, Mies van der Rohe: A Critical Biography (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1985), 145, 147 (photo).Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Haus Lange was exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art in the 1932 Modern Architecture—International Exhibition and again in the 1947 Mies van der Rohe retrospective.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Johnson, Mies van der Rohe (New York: Museum of Modern Art, 1947), 206.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Jan Maruhn and Nina Senger, “Two Villas,” in Ein Ort fur Kunst/A Place for Art: Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, Haus Lange-Haus Esters, ed. Julian Heynen (Krefeld: Krefelder Kunstmuseen and Verlag Gerd Hatje, 1995), 13.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Johnson, Mies van der Rohe, 206.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Bill, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe (Milano: Il Balcone, 1955), 33.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Hilberseimer, Mies van der Rohe (Chicago: Paul Theobald and Company, 1956); Blake, Mies van der Rohe: Architecture and Structure (Baltimore: Penguin Books, 1964), 37.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Blaser, Mies van der Rohe (New York: Praeger Publishers, 1965).Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Tegethoff, Mies van der Rohe: die Villen und Landhausprojekte (Essen: R. Bacht, 1981). English translation by Russell M. Stockman, Mies van der Rohe: the Villas and Country Houses (New York: Museum of Modern Art, 1985).Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Schulze, Mies van der Rohe: A Critical Biography, 144–47; Spaeth, Mies van der Rohe (New York: Rizzoli, 1985), 56–57; Frank Russell, ed., Mies van der Rohe: European Works (London: Academy Editions; New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1986), 58–61; Cohen, Mies van der Rohe, trans. Maggie Rosengarten (London and New York: E & FN Spon, 1996), 50–51.Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Frampton, “Mies van der Rohe: Avant-Garde and Continuity,” in Studies in Tectonic Culture: The Poetics of Construction in Nineteenth and Twentieth Century Architecture (Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, 1995), 163–67.Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Heynen, Ein Ort für Kunst/A Place for Art.Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    Heynen, Ein Ort der denkt: Haus Lange und Haus Esters von Ludwig Mies van der Rohe: Moderne Architektur und Gegenwartskunst/A Place That Thinks: Haus Lange and Haus Esters by Ludwig Mies van der Rohe: Modern Architecture and Contemporary Art (Krefeld: Krefelder Kunstmuseen, 2000).Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    Riley and Bergdoll, eds., Mies in Berlin (New York: Museum of Modern Art, 2001), 220–27.Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    Frampton, “Mies van der Rohe: Avant-Garde and Continuity,” 167. See also Tegethoff, Mies van der Rohe: The Art of Structure (New York: Praeger, 1965), 21–23.Google Scholar
  17. 17.
    See Werner Blaser, Mies van der Rohe: The Villas and Country Houses, 63.Google Scholar
  18. 18.
    Gombrich, “Art History and the Social Sciences,” in Ideals and Idols: Essays on Values in History and in Art (Oxford: Phaidon, 1979), 136.Google Scholar
  19. 19.
    Evans, “Mies van der Rohe’s Paradoxical Symmetries,” in Translations from Drawing to Building and Other Essays (Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, 1997), 241.Google Scholar
  20. 20.
    See, for example, Evans, “Mies van der Rohe’s Paradoxical Symmetries,” and Caroline Constant, “The Barcelona Pavilion as Landscape Garden: Modernity and the Picturesque,” AA Files 20 (Autumn 1990): 46–54; and Jose Quetglas, “Fear of Glass: The Barcelona Pavilion,” in Architecture Production, ed. Beatriz Colomina (New York: Princeton Architectural Press, 1988), 122–51.Google Scholar
  21. 21.
    Information on Hermann Lange is drawn largely from Jan Maruhn, “Bauherr der Moderne: Der Krefelder Seidenfabrikant Hermann Lange und sein Architekt Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, 1926–1938,” (Ph.D diss., Magister Artium, Freie Universität Berlin, 1996); Maruhn and Senger, “Two Villas,” 7–19.Google Scholar
  22. 22.
    Francesco Dal Co, Figures of Architecture and Thought: German Architecture Culture, 1880–1920 (New York: Rizzoli, 1990), 172.Google Scholar
  23. 23.
    Tegethoff, Mies van der Rohe: The Villas and Country Houses, 61.Google Scholar
  24. 24.
    Maruhn and Senger, “Hermann Lange-Patron of Modernism,” in Heynen, Ein Ort für Kunst/A Place for Art, 17.Google Scholar
  25. 25.
    Elaine S. Hochman, Architects of Fortune: Mies van der Rohe and the Third Reich (New York: Weidenfeld & Nicolson, 1989), 58–59. Hochman makes this claim without citing evidence. Maruhn in turn cites Hochman. See Maruhn, “Bauherr der Moderne,” 21 n. 95.Google Scholar
  26. 26.
    Maruhn, “Bauherr der Moderne,” 26.Google Scholar
  27. 27.
    A. Spelberg, Gartendenkmalpflegerische Bearbeitung der Gärten Haus Lange/Haus Esters (Krefeld: Stadt Krefeld-Grünflächenamt, 1992), 16, 18.Google Scholar
  28. 28.
    Julian Heynen, conversation with authors, Krefeld, Germany, September 20–21, 1995.Google Scholar
  29. 29.
    The term “minimal art” is often considered to have originated in the essay of the same name. See Richard Wollheim, “Minimal Art,” Arts Magazine (January 1965). By 1995, the identification of Mies’s architecture with minimalism had reached the point where it could be contested. See Rosalind Krauss, “The Grid, the /Cloud/, the Detail,” and Ignasi de Solá-Morales Rubió, “Mies van der Rohe and Minimalism,” in The Presence of Mies, ed. Detlef Mertins (New York: Princeton Architectural Press, 1994), 133–47, 149–55.Google Scholar

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