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Harm Reduction in The Control of Infectious Diseases Among Injection Drug Users

  • Harold Pollack
Part of the International Series in Operations Research & Management Science book series (ISOR, volume 70)

Summary

Operations research has contributed to the control of blood-borne epidemics among injection drug users. The analysis of random-mixing models has led to a deeper understanding of both syringe exchange programs and substance abuse treatment in the control of HIV/AIDS and hepatitis. This chapter presents some of these results, and analyzes illustrative models to show how simplified, but empirically pertinent mathematical models can assist policymakers evaluate public health interventions.

Key words

Epidemic control HIV Hepatitis C 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Harold Pollack
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Public HealthUniversity of Michigan Ann ArborMI

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