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Cultural Patterns As A Component Of Environmental Planning And Design

  • R.D. Brown
  • R. Lafortezza
  • R.C. Corry
  • D.B. Leal
  • G. Sanesi
Chapter

Abstract

Rural landscapes are multi-functional systems. Environmental functions are influenced by both natural and cultural landscape patterns. Beyond the traditional productive functions, rural landscapes are increasingly being recognized as complementary sources of biodiversity and places for cultural identification. Rural landscapes can often be seen as a complex assemblage of structural elements (patches, corridors, and matrix) whose arrangement reflects the magnitude, intensity, and type of human intervention and influence. This chapter describes some of the cultural patterns inherent in selected rural landscapes. It outlines how cultural artifacts and remnant habitat patches can affect ecological functions in two contrasting landscapes: the relatively young agricultural landscapes of southern Ontario, Canada; and longer-established agricultural landscapes of the Apulia region in southern Italy. For these landscapes, we illustrate the effects of cultural settlement patterns on habitat patterns and discuss implications for enhancing ecological attributes through landscape planning and design

Keywords

Landscape Pattern Ecological Function Olive Grove Stone Wall Cultural Pattern 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • R.D. Brown
    • 1
  • R. Lafortezza
    • 2
  • R.C. Corry
    • 1
  • D.B. Leal
    • 1
  • G. Sanesi
    • 2
  1. 1.School of Environmental Design and Rural DevelopmentUniversity of Guelph GuelphOntarioCanada N1G 2W1
  2. 2.Department of Plant Production ScienceUniversity of BariBariItaly

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