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Kyoto as a Garden City

A landscape ecological perception of Japanese garden design
  • Y. Morimoto
Chapter

Abstract

This paper will explain the key phrase of "Kyoto as a Garden City," as a secondary nature based on comprehending three ideas: one, the relationship between the landscape of Kyoto and the site of the Japanese garden, namely, the understanding of the garden culture as a part of the landscape. Two, garden, as secondary nature is the result of the continuous interaction of nature and the garden, rather than nature or the design intention itself. Lastly, the creation of Japanese gardens was based on the fractal property of unconsciously recreating nature. These discussions are inspired by ecological and landscape ecological concepts, such as edge effects, eco-tones, disturbance dependent ecosystems and hierarchical perception of ecosystems. The author concludes that the amenity of traditional Japanese garden is strongly related to the sustainability, which is clarified by landscape ecology.

Keywords

Fractal Property Garden City Landscape Architecture Laurel Forest Maple Tree 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Y. Morimoto
    • 1
  1. 1.Graduate School of Global Environmental StudiesKyoto UniversityKyotoJapan

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